A Model for Crowdsourcing Development of Databases for Qur’anic Studies Sources

  • Hussein Mollanazar Allameh Tabataba’i University
  • Akram Tayyebi Allameh Tabataba'i University
Keywords: Translating Qur’anic Studies sources, crowdsourcing, term bases, translation memories

Abstract

Technology has become an integral part of the translation task. Nevertheless, few translation memories and term bases are available for translating Qur’anic Studies sources. Without them, attaining maximum efficiency in this field is not possible because such tools facilitate decision-making in the translation process from/into Persian. There is an imperative need for developing such databases. Creating parallel corpora and aligning them to come up with translation memories and term banks can help improve the quantity and quality of translations of Qur’anic Studies sources from/into Persian. However, this task cannot be carried out by a single person. Using crowdsourcing in developing TMs and TBs for Qur’anic Studies sources is an alternative that can expedite the task. Nonetheless, crowdsourcing in developing such databases is a relatively unattended research area. Examining existing models revealed that no pre-existing Translation Studies model suited the needs of this study. With the motive of filling this gap, the researchers opted for developing and validating a model for human resource management in Translation Studies through adopting a crowdsourcing model (the Metropolis Model) and adapting it for their specific conditions (developingthe Jāmiʿ model). Findings of this research indicate that the Jāmiʿ Model is adequate for developing TMs and TBs.

Author Biographies

Hussein Mollanazar, Allameh Tabataba’i University

Associate Professor, Department of English Translation Studies, Faculty of Persian Literature and Foreign Languages, Allameh Tabataba'i University, Tehran, Iran;

Akram Tayyebi, Allameh Tabataba'i University

Ph.D. Candidate in Translation Studies, Department of English Translation Studies, Faculty of Persian Literature and Foreign Languages, Allameh Tabataba'i University, Tehran, Iran;

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Published
2019-08-30
How to Cite
Mollanazar, H., & Tayyebi, A. (2019). A Model for Crowdsourcing Development of Databases for Qur’anic Studies Sources. Translation Studies Quarterly, 17(66), 24-43. Retrieved from http://journal.translationstudies.ir/ts/article/view/692
Section
Scientific Articles